AW Insect Book: Beetles - Photos & Descriptions

Discussions and information on all Southern African Invertebrates

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Klipspringer
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Re: AW Insect Book: Beetles - Photos & Descriptions

Post by Klipspringer » Sat Feb 08, 2020 7:13 pm

Dumpy Longhorn Beetle Tetradia lophoptera
Family: Cerambycidae. Subfamily: Lamiinae. Tribe: Crossotini


Tetradia lophoptera Dumpy Longhorn Beetle.jpg
Tetradia lophoptera Dumpy Longhorn Beetle.jpg (137.54 KiB) Viewed 57 times
Tetradia lophoptera.jpg
Tetradia lophoptera.jpg (77.06 KiB) Viewed 57 times
Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park © ExFmem


Description
Medium-sized (body length 13 mm), short and stocky, coarsely sculptured on the pronotum and especially at base of the elytra. Black, with a covering of grey down and a greyish-white patch on each side of the pronotum. Near base of each elytron is a raised area with a U-shaped tuft of brown hairs. Antennae and legs blackish-brown, with a covering of greyish-white hairs.

Distribution
Widespread in South Africa, except Western and Eastern Cape.

Habitat
Arid savanna.

Klipspringer
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Re: AW Insect Book: Beetles - Photos & Descriptions

Post by Klipspringer » Wed Feb 12, 2020 12:09 pm

Ochre Ladybird Beetle Ortalia ochracea ochracea
Family: Coccinellidae. Subfamily: Ortaliinae. Tribe: Ortaliini

Image
Kruger National Park, Bateleur camp © ExFmem

All species of Ortalia are large, pubescent (hairy) beetles with fine punctuation. They have short 10 to 11-segmented antennae and very large, oval finely granulated eyes. Adults and larvae of all species are are predators and eat psyllids.
In most species of lady beetles (Coccinellidae) both larvae and adults are predatory, and the family has an illustrious history of use in biological control. However, it is now generally recognized that most of these so-called predators feed facultatively on honeydew, pollen, nectar and fungi, and many species regularly ingest small amounts of plant tissue even in the presence of abundant prey.
Among the predaceous coccinellids, feeding preferences vary widely. Most of the preferred prey belong to the hemipteran suborder Sternorrhyncha (aphids, aldelgids, scales, mealybugs, whiteflies, and psyllids). Some coccinellid species are known to feed on ants. Other coccinellid species are specialists on non-insects; for example, all members of the tribe Stethorini prey on tetranychid mites.

Description
A relatively large ladybeetle, measuring about 5–5,5 mm in length and 4,0–4,5 mm in width.
It is pale yellow without patches on the elytra. Covered with short yellowish down. Head, pronotum, appendages including mouthparts, are orange.

Distribution
Throughout Southern and Eastern Africa.

Links:
https://www.zobodat.at/pdf/MittMuenchEn ... 7-0117.pdf

Klipspringer
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Re: AW Insect Book: Beetles - Photos & Descriptions

Post by Klipspringer » Thu Feb 13, 2020 9:16 pm

Flea Beetle Calotheca sp.
Family: Chrysomelidae. Subfamily: Galerucinae. Tribe: Alticini

Image © ExFmem
Kruger National Park

The Alticini is a tribe composed of minute to medium sized beetles, whose enlarged hind femora and renowned jumping ability have earned them the common name of ‘flea beetles’. They are highly specialised phytophagous insects. Both the adult and larval stages feed on stems, leaves or roots, and rarely on flowers, in almost all the higher plant families. The tribe Alticini includes 4,000 to 8,000 species, grouped in approximately 500 genera. This taxon has a world-wide distribution, but occurs mainly in the tropical regions of South America, Africa and Asia.

Jumping activity is traditionally considered an anti-predator mechanism that originated as a result of predator–prey interactions or as a response to disturbance, i.e. a defense reaction. The uniqueness of this type of locomotion is thought to be, foremost, that it provides an effective defense mechanism for comparatively low energetic outlays accompanied by relatively simple structure. The force needed to deform the ‘spring’ can be recovered further in its elastic recoil. The spring is usually composed of the rubbery protein resilin, providing elasticity and preventing fractioning and fatigue of the material. The slow muscle contraction performs a mechanical reversible deformation of the spring, energy is stored in the form of elastic strain energy and finally very rapidly converted into kinetic energy. The morphological structures for the accumulation and storage of the elastic energy in jumping insects are variable, taking the form of semilunar plates in grasshoppers, locusts and crickets, resilin pads in fleas, thoracic pleural arches in froghoppers and planthoppers, and an abdominal appendage in springtails. Although jumping beetles are well known, the specialized jumping apparatus is not widespread and has been observed so far only in the families Curculionidae (weevils), Chrysomelidae (leaf beetles), Buprestidae (jewel beetles) and Scirtidae (marsh beetles).

Genus Calotheca
Larger than 4 mm. Antennae short, not reaching half elytral length. Elytral punctation arranged in regular rows , very rarely in double rows.
Pronotal surface with deeply impressed striae or punctures. Pronotum with two striae formed by some large and deeply impressed punctures running from anterior pronotal margin towards pronotal disc, sometimes L or C shaped. Pronotal punctation mostly homogeneous and uniformly distributed.

The genus Calotheca is widespread in Sub-Saharan Africa, especially in the southern and eastern areas. Records of Calotheca (reported as Blepharida) hosts in Africa are scarce, but they all identify the genera Rhus, Ozoroa, Schinus and Searsia from the Anacardiaceae, as well as the genus Commiphora from the Burseraceae, as primary host plants.

List of species:
Calotheca conradsi
Calotheca evanida
Calotheca haroldi
Calotheca holubi
Calotheca inornata
Calotheca laterimaculata
Calotheca lewini
Calotheca marginalis
Calotheca marmorata
Calotheca natalensis
Calotheca nigromaculata
Calotheca nigrotessellata
Calotheca occidentalis
Calotheca ornata
Calotheca pallida
Calotheca parvula
Calotheca pauli
Calotheca regularis
Calotheca reticulata
Calotheca thunbergi
Calotheca vittata


Links:
https://www.researchgate.net/publicatio ... subgen_nov
https://jeb.biologists.org/content/219/13/2015

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Re: Africa Wild Insect Book: Beetles - Photos & Descriptions

Post by Klipspringer » Sat Feb 15, 2020 2:54 am

Ground Beetle Lipostratia elongata
Family: Carabidae. Subfamily: Lebiinae. Tribee: Lebiini

Lipostratia elongata.jpg
Lipostratia elongata.jpg (63.42 KiB) Viewed 24 times

Kgalagadi © ExFmem

Klipspringer
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Re: Africa Wild Insect Book: Beetles - Photos & Descriptions

Post by Klipspringer » Sun Feb 16, 2020 7:37 pm

Pondo-Pondo Longhorn Ceroplesis thunbergii
Superfamily: Chrysomeloidea. Family: Cerambycidae. Subfamily: Lamiinae. Tribe: Ceroplesini.

Ceroplesis thunbergii.jpg
Ceroplesis thunbergii.jpg (106.31 KiB) Viewed 17 times
Mkhuze © Dindigwe


Description
Size: 24 mm. Head, antennae and legs black. Body heavily textured with puncture marks and strikingly marked with 3 sets of alternating red and black transverse bands.

Geographical distribution
Widespread.

Links:
https://books.google.de/books?id=js6NDw ... ii&f=false

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Richprins
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Re: AW Insect Book: Beetles - Photos & Descriptions

Post by Richprins » Mon Feb 17, 2020 7:41 am

The Greta beetle! ..0..
Please check Needs Attention pre-booking: https://africawild-forum.com/viewtopic.php?f=322&t=596

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