South Luangwa

Information & Discussion on Zambia Game Parks
User avatar
iNdlovu
Posts: 4781
Joined: Sat May 19, 2012 11:58 am
Country: South Africa
Location: Lowveld, South Africa

South Luangwa

Post by iNdlovu » Wed May 23, 2012 2:04 pm

Zambia Elephant rescue*

Most conservationists believe that man should not meddle with the natural order and that we should allow nature to run her course however cruel or grim it seems to be. We agree on the whole, unless a wildlife problem has been created by man (for instance in the case of snaring or being trapped in a fence, in which case it's justifiable to intervene) then nature should be left to her own devices. She has a plan.

However - every rule has an exception and the dreadful plight of a baby elephant trapped in the mud of the Kapani Lagoon and her mother, who had also got stuck trying to save her yesterday had us all in a frenzy of activity. We simply could not stand by and watch them struggle and slowly die. South Luangwa Conservation Society together with our neighbours - ZAWA - the wildlife authority - agreed with us and we all joined forces to try and save the mum and baby. I usually try to keep the newsletters short, but I hope you'll forgive me for making an exception with this one and agree that this story is worth a little extra time and attention.

Abraham got these great photos of the unfolding drama......

Image
The family herd desperately trying to help the screaming Mum and baby escape but they were completely stuck in the deep, rapidly drying mud with no chance of getting out
Image

The brave and skilled SLCS team manages to slip a rope under the baby, narrowly avoiding mums thrashing trunk - and starts to haul her out .....
Image
Image

Nearly there - the whole team is hauling as hard as they can..... But the baby is terribly frightened and won't leave mum's side
Image
Image

Again - she's out and we think we're almost there...... But despite my frantic waving and shouting - she won't leave her mum
Image
Image

One more try - the team pull her further away from mum this time..... They unwrap the ropes and help her to her feet
Image
Image

This time - thanks to a young herd cousin calling her to safety..... she makes a dash for it as the rest of the herd scream for her to come to them
Image
Image

Now back to mum who is dehydrated and exhausted - we've been pouring water over her to try to protect her from the scorching midday sun. SLCS staff carefully slip a rope under her....
Image
Image

and the tractor starts to pull and pull - inching her out of what would have been a muddy grave - she seems to sense that there's a chance of escape and begins to struggle for her life...
Image
Image

With us all shouting encouragment and just willing her to keep going "come on Mama, come on Mama"....... to the delight of us all - she makes it! Weak and wobbly she drags herself out
Image
Image


and runs to find her baby and the rest of her waiting herd! The happiest possible ending!
Image

The SLCS team all share a celebratory drink on the Kapani deck with our relieved guests!
Image

This is all in a day’s work for the amazing Rachel McRobb and her outstanding team at The South Luangwa Conservation Society. Go towww.slcszambia.org
http://click.icptrack.com/icp/relay.php ... zambia.org
- it’s a fantastic site and well worth a visit. You will be amazed at what this relatively small group can achieve – their dedication and commitment to wildlife is inspiring.

Together with our local wildlife authority – the South Luangwa Area Management Unit of the Zambia Wildlife Authority, they are extremely effective at anti-poaching activities including anti-snaring and patrolling in vulnerable areas of the National Park. Rachel and her team are also skilled at darting snared animals, removing the snares and treating the horrific wounds they cause.

Their awareness raising activities and work with other local conservation groups are incredibly effective. Of course – this all takes money so please consider becoming a regular supporter.
Our MD Dave Wilson and NCS Director Adrian Carr are both active trustees in SLCS.It was extremely heartening for us all to see how many local people joined in the efforts to free these two elephants – the cheers of joy, first when the baby ran to his cousin and then when Mum was finally released from the jaws of the sticky, cloying mud were wonderful! Everyone seemed to identify with the mum’s plight - we all saw the incredible emotional bond between the worried herd members and mum and baby. Thank you SLCS and ZAWA and also all the NCS staff who bravely fought to make this a happy ending!

User avatar
Lisbeth
Global Moderator
Posts: 52244
Joined: Sat May 19, 2012 12:31 pm
Country: Switzerland
Location: Lugano

Re: South Luangwa

Post by Lisbeth » Tue Jul 02, 2019 12:17 pm

Construction of Luangwa River hydroelectric dam halted, conservationists delighted

Posted on 2 July, 2019 by News Desk in Destinations, News, Zambia and the News Desk post series.

Image
The Luangwa River in Zambia © Shenton Safaris

In a move that has delighted conservationists, the Zambian Ministry of Energy has announced that the plans to construct a hydroelectric dam on the Luangwa River has been halted due to the cancellation of the feasibility study rights for the project.

In a press release by WWF Zambia, the plan has been put on hold after the interested developer for the proposed Ndevu Gorge hydroelectric power plant had not undertaken any feasibility study and, therefore, the feasibility study rights were withdrawn.

The Luangwa River is one of the longest remaining free-flowing rivers in Zambia and one of the biggest unaltered rivers in Southern Africa, as identified by the research of WWF and partners. Constructing a hydroelectric dam on the Luangwa River would have threatened the ecosystem services the river provides and would have led to loss of natural capital on which livelihoods, wildlife-based economies, and heritage values are founded.

Image
A great egret in search of fish, while yellow-billed storks patiently wait for any sign of prey in South Luangwa National Park, Zambia © WWF Zambia

A year ago WWF Zambia launched a public campaign to advocate for the protection of the river from threats such as the Ndevu Gorge Dam, deforestation and unsustainable agriculture. Over 197,000 people added their voice to the campaign.

The construction of the dam would have also affected the local communities spread across 25 chiefdoms. The river currently provides extremely valuable and crucial ecosystem services to these people, including safe drinking water, floodplain agriculture, fishing, goods and trade, wild fruit, honey, local construction materials and local crafts. The Luangwa River also has significant cultural and spiritual heritage for the country.

Quoting Senior Chief Luembe of the Nsenga people, “I wish to thank government, for listening to our plea. Luembe has the potential to become another area of wildlife tourism in a few years to come. The dam would have disturbed the free movement of wildlife along and across the Luangwa Valley. There are other means that can supply an equivalent amount of electricity like solar power and windmill generators that can be installed along the Muchinga escarpment, with less ecosystem damage”.

Image
Elias Zimba, a local fisherman laying his nets in the Luangwa River © James Suter / WWF Zambia

The Luangwa River Valley currently provides a mosaic of diverse habitats, including riparian forest, grassed dambos, floodplain grassland and deciduous woodlands. The natural hydrology of the Luangwa River allows for flooding in the rainy season – December to April – creating seasonal wetlands, oxbow lakes, sandbars and other features that create rich habitat for plants and wildlife.

WWF Zambia say that the have now begun a formal process to urge the relevant authorities to declare the Luangwa River a Water Resource Protection Area, in line with the Water Resource Management Act No. 21 of 2011.

Image
The Luangwa River at sunrise © WWF Zambia
"Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world." Nelson Mandela
The desire for equality must never exceed the demands of knowledge

User avatar
Richprins
Committee Member
Posts: 64627
Joined: Sat May 19, 2012 3:52 pm
Location: NELSPRUIT

Re: South Luangwa

Post by Richprins » Tue Jul 02, 2019 5:33 pm

I wish our conservation ministry would take EIAs seriously... O**
Please check Needs Attention pre-booking: https://africawild-forum.com/viewtopic.php?f=322&t=596

User avatar
Lisbeth
Global Moderator
Posts: 52244
Joined: Sat May 19, 2012 12:31 pm
Country: Switzerland
Location: Lugano

Re: South Luangwa

Post by Lisbeth » Tue Jul 02, 2019 6:55 pm

We'll still have to see ;-)
"Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world." Nelson Mandela
The desire for equality must never exceed the demands of knowledge

Return to “All you need to know about Zambia Game Parks”