Malaria

Advice, information and discussions on travelling in Southern Africa
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Lisbeth
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Re: Malaria

Post by Lisbeth » Tue Sep 25, 2018 7:33 pm

Mostly when man arrives at this point, 10 years later they find out that they have destroyed something else too.... O-/

It would have been better to find a vaccine :yes:
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Flutterby
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Re: Malaria

Post by Flutterby » Wed Sep 26, 2018 9:38 am

I thought the same thing Lis! O-/

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Re: Malaria

Post by Dzombo » Fri Oct 19, 2018 11:37 am


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Lisbeth
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Re: Malaria

Post by Lisbeth » Tue Oct 23, 2018 3:16 pm

Malaria makes a comeback in SA – Netcare Travel Clinics

South Africans urged to take precautions when travelling to malaria areas

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896 cases of malaria in the province of Mpumalanga were reported during December.

As the northern parts of South Africa head into their rainy summer season, visitors to areas where malaria is endemic are warned to pay the necessary attention to protecting themselves from the dangerous mosquito-borne illness.

“Unfortunately, we haven’t seen the last of malaria in South Africa, which by all indications is making something of a come back, and over the last year there have been a number of cases reported from areas where it was previously thought to have been eliminated, such as the Waterberg District in the north-east of Limpopo province,” observed Dr Peter Vincent of Netcare Travel Clinics and Medicross Tokai.

“The rainy summer season in the northern parts of South Africa is associated with an increase in the numbers of malaria-carrying Anopheles mosquito and a considerably enhanced risk of contracting the illness within the endemic areas of southern Africa. The risk is highest between September through to the following May, which is considered to be ‘malaria season’ in South Africa,” added Dr Vincent.

Dr Vincent warned that malaria infection can result in serious, complications, particularly if it is not identified and treated at an early stage. He said that Netcare Travel Clinics is consequently advising travellers to do their homework before visiting areas where malaria may be present. This is particularly important as the National Institute of Communicable Diseases (NICD) recently proposed expanding the malaria risk areas within South Africa.

“Make sure you know where these areas are and understand what kinds of precautions may be necessary ahead of your trip. Malaria poses a risk in the northern parts of Limpopo province, eastern Mpumalanga and northern KwaZulu-Natal as well as in parts of neighbouring countries such as Mozambique, Botswana, Zimbabwe and Namibia.

Dr Vincent noted that the NICD earlier this year, warned that there was an increased risk of acquiring malaria in endemic areas both inside and beyond the borders of the country. In addition, based on its infection data, the NICD has now proposed a change in its Malaria Risk Map for South Africa for the first time since 2013.

The map, which was published in the NICD’s Communicable Diseases Communiqué of September 2018, and was yet to be approved by the Department of Health at the time of writing, proposes extending the low-risk malaria areas to as far west as Lephalale in Limpopo province and medium-risk areas to beyond Musina in the west, and Hoedspruit in the north-west.

The NICD recommends visitors to low-risk areas take precautions against being bitten by mosquitos, but advises additional measures, including the use of appropriate prophylaxis medications when visiting medium- or high-risk areas in Southern Africa.

“Should any traveller to a malaria area develop flu-like symptoms for up to six months following their trip, they should have an urgent blood test for malaria. This is extremely important, as malaria is commonly misdiagnosed as flu and this can have serious, sometimes even fatal, consequences for the individual involved,” warns Dr Vincent.

“When visiting one of the higher risk areas, we recommend you adopt a comprehensive prevention strategy that not only includes the use of a prophylaxis medication that is prescribed by your doctor, or travel clinic, but to also adopt the necessary measures to avoid being bitten by mosquitos,” added Dr Vincent.

Dr Vincent advised those who are visiting any area where there may be a risk of contracting malaria, to use insect repellents containing DEET on all areas of the skin that are exposed, and to sleep under DEET-impregnated mosquito nets at all times of the year.

He pointed out, although it may be active throughout the day on overcast days, the malaria-carrying mosquito is usually a dusk to dawn feeder and advised people to change into long-sleeved shirts and blouses, long trousers and socks as evening approaches.

“Many South Africans are still not aware of the very real dangers that malaria can pose to their health. Netcare Travel Clinics consequently urges them to keep this in mind ahead of travelling to a malaria area this summer, and to take all necessary precautions to protect themselves and their families,” concludes Dr Vincent.
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Re: Malaria

Post by Peter Betts » Tue Oct 23, 2018 4:01 pm

Yip I took pills for the first time in many years ..Jane cant take them and uses Health remedies and covers up at night

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Re: Malaria

Post by Richprins » Fri Oct 26, 2018 8:41 am

Facts and myths about malaria
Immunity ceases soon after the you leave an endemic malaria area. On return you are at greater risk of contracting malaria, as they usually take no precautions.
16 hours ago
Stefan de Villiers

As the northern parts of South Africa head into the rainy summer season, visitors to areas like the Lowveld are warned to pay the necessary attention to protect themselves from the dangerous mosquito-borne illness.

The rainy summer season is associated with an increase in the numbers of malaria-carrying Anopheles mosquito and a considerably enhanced risk of contracting the illness within the endemic areas of southern Africa.

The risk is highest between September through to the following May, which is considered to be ‘malaria season’ in South Africa.

Doctors warn that malaria infection can result in serious complications, particularly if it is not identified and treated at an early stage.

Travellers are advised to do their homework before visiting the Lowveld.

Malaria poses a risk in the northern parts of Limpopo, eastern Mpumalanga and northern KwaZulu-Natal as well as in parts of neighbouring countries such as Mozambique, Botswana, Zimbabwe and Namibia.

Facts and myths about Malaria, amended from information supplied by Netcare

• Anopheles mosquitoes transmits malaria. Only about 30 to 40 of the 3 500 mosquito species can transmit malaria. Only the females of these species transmit the disease.

• Take steps to avoid getting bitten by mosquitoes, such as spraying fabric insecticides on your clothes as well as wearing long-sleeved tops and long pants, especially between dusk and dawn.

• 90 percent of worldwide malaria-related deaths that occur in Africa. The majority of these are children under the age of five.

• Malaria is estimated to cost Africa more than $12 billion every year in lost GDP.

• Fever, chills, headache, and other flu-like symptoms are common symptoms of malaria. Proper diagnosis and early treatment can usually prevent severe illness and death.

• Eating garlic does not offers protection against malaria.

• It takes just one bite from an infected mosquito to pass on the infection.

• Immunity ceases soon after the you leave an endemic malaria area. On return you are at greater risk of contracting malaria, as they usually take no precautions.

• Children above the weight of 11 kilogram, may take paediatric prophylaxis.

• A vaccine could be rolled out in the next couple of years, thanks to the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

• Malaria needs to be properly managed through early diagnosis and prompt treatment to prevent fatal outcomes. Apart from preventing further complications this also shortens the duration of the disease.

• Researchers at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine allow mosquitoes to suck blood from their arms twice a week, as they develop new techniques to combat them.
Image

• Mosquitoes act as vectors or carriers to spread the infection to humans of all ages, from babies to the elderly. The Anopheles female mosquito usually feeds (i.e. bites humans) between dusk and dawn. Three provinces in South Africa i.e. Limpopo, Mpumalanga and KwaZulu-Natal are high-risk areas for malaria, with transmission occurring predominantly between September and May.

• An infected mosquito does not suffer, unlike the human it infects who could present with symptoms, sometimes within days of being bitten.

• Overlanders who should consider taking rapid malaria testing kits plus standby treatment when going to remote areas in endemic malaria regions for prolonged periods.

• Pregnant women should avoid travelling to areas where malaria transmission occurs, and parents are advised not to take their infants or young children to areas where there is risk of P. falciparum malaria. When this cannot be avoided, it is important to take effective preventive measures against malaria.

• Ronald Ross in 1902 was awarded the second medical Nobel Prize for Medicine “for his work on malaria, by which he has shown how it enters the organism and thereby has laid the foundation for successful research on this disease and methods of combating it”.

• The time between the infective mosquito bite and the development of malaria symptoms can range from seven to 40 days depending on the type of Plasmodia involved. One strain called P. vivax, may have a prolonged incubation period of eight to ten months.

• If you experience flu-like symptoms, always tell your doctor if you have visited a malaria area, demand a blood test and follow up on the result.

• Sleeping under insecticide-treated bed nets (ITNs), is a form of personal protection that has been shown to reduce malaria illness, severe disease, and death among those under five years old by about 20 per cent, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Only pyrethroid insecticides are approved for use on ITNs. These insecticides have proved to pose very low health risks to humans and other mammals, but are toxic to insects, even at very low doses.

• Never visit a malaria area without taking precautions because your friend says there is no need to do so. Just because they say so does not make it true.

• Wristbands according to laboratory studies on 16 subjects have shown to give no protection. DEET (N-Diethyl-meta-toluamide) products, however, were shown to disorientate the mosquitoes for up to 302 minutes. Citronella products gave protection for 20 minutes before reapplication had to take place.

• Keep DEET containing repellents away from plastics including cameras and spectacle frames as it will dissolve them.

• You cannot contract malaria from someone else.

Be aware of risks, minimise exposure to mosquito bites, take prophylactic drugs if indicated and seek early diagnosis and treatment if you suspect you may have malaria.

https://lowvelder.co.za/456406/facts-my ... epeat=w3tc
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Lisbeth
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Re: Malaria

Post by Lisbeth » Fri Oct 26, 2018 10:31 am

@RP - Living in an infested area, what do you do?
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Richprins
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Re: Malaria

Post by Richprins » Fri Oct 26, 2018 12:41 pm

Down here doctors always ask when last you were in a malaria area or check for malaria whatever illness you see them for! :-0
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Lisbeth
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Re: Malaria

Post by Lisbeth » Fri Oct 26, 2018 1:18 pm

That's not what I asked 0'
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Richprins
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Re: Malaria

Post by Richprins » Fri Oct 26, 2018 1:32 pm

I don't take anything except tea! :-0
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