Spotted Hyena

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Flutterby
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Re: Spotted Hyena

Post by Flutterby » Tue Jul 17, 2018 9:49 am

lol

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Lisbeth
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Re: Spotted Hyena

Post by Lisbeth » Tue Aug 07, 2018 2:16 pm

CAUTION!


phpBB [video]


After a morning coffee break, we decided to view the lions (that had been found earlier in the morning) without any expectations of them moving away from a relatively shady spot. We were wrong and gladly so! The two lionesses began to stretch and yawn, both signs of lions becoming active. They were soon up and walking towards a small watering hole nearby.

Their demeanor drastically changed, and they began to stalk a herd of impala that had already taken shade in the relatively dense thicket. Turning the vehicle off and watching from a neutral distance so as not to affect the potential hunt (for predator or prey), we heard the alarm calls of the impala and raced in.

To our amazement, in the frantic nature of the hunt, the lions had managed to catch a panicked warthog. The warthog began fighting and screaming and continued fighting for about fifteen minutes. Its power and determination was incredible to witness despite its imminent demise. The frantic noises of the kill and the alarming impala drew the attention of nearby hyenas. At first, there were three, then five, then nine, then 12 and then 15.

It was absolutely incredible! They challenged the lions with noisy intimidation of cackles and laughing whilst then slowly surrounding them. Soon, many hyenas had gathered and the fight was on. The one lion left just in time whilst the remaining lionesses stayed behind a second or two too long and received a few bites as she made her hasty retreat.

Needless to say the remaining warthog’s scraps didn’t go too far amongst fifteen hungry hyenas. This was probably my best sighting ever. Seeing a predator on predator interaction is special enough but to have a kill in it that makes it once in a lifetime.”

https://lowvelder.co.za/445483/lions-ea ... -try-take/
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Re: Spotted Hyena

Post by Flutterby » Tue Aug 07, 2018 2:24 pm

:shock:

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Re: Spotted Hyena

Post by Richprins » Tue Aug 07, 2018 5:19 pm

Exceptional footage, I must say. Interesting the difference in calling by the hyenas from approach to attack! ^Q^

Also interesting the incessant babbling of the Pom in the background... :O^
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Re: Spotted Hyena

Post by Lisbeth » Tue Aug 07, 2018 5:36 pm

I have stole a word from your post and put it on top of the video, RP :ty:
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Re: Spotted Hyena

Post by Richprins » Tue Aug 07, 2018 5:39 pm

:twisted: 0/0
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Re: Spotted Hyena

Post by Lisbeth » Fri Aug 10, 2018 1:06 pm

Video: Spotted hyena project commences with collaring first of 14 hyenas

Posted on 6 August, 2018 by News Desk in Conservation, News, Wildlife and the News Desk post series.

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The collaring team at work © Wild Tomorrow Fund

Press release from Wild Tomorrow Fund

Last month, a new phase of the Mun-Ya-Wana Conservancy Spotted Hyena Project (MCSHP) commenced with the collaring of the first of over a dozen spotted hyena with a GPS/VHF collar. Based at andBeyond Phinda Private Game Reserve, the MCSHP has worked to monitor the hyena populations within Phinda and the neighbouring uMkhuze Game Reserve since 2014.

The project is led by ecologist Axel Hunnicutt from Wild Tomorrow Fund, who has watched and recorded the decline of spotted hyenas over the last four years. The MCSHP contributed to and authored the 2016 International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Regional Red List Assessment for spotted hyena, listing them as Near Threatened in Southern Africa, due to low survival probabilities for the cubs and adults resident at Phinda and uMkhuze, as well as declining population trends.

“Unlike most large carnivores in Africa, spotted hyenas have largely been outside the spotlight for both research and public support. This project is unique in both its intensity and scale, to better understand how spotted hyena utilise the mixed landscape in Zululand,” said Hunnicutt. “These collared hyenas will help us answer a variety of questions about how hyena and people interact, and will educate us on how to better conserve the species.”

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The hyena is blindfolded during the collaring © Wild Tomorrow Fund

This next step in hyena research was made possible through a grant from the Oak Foundation, along with the support of Wild Tomorrow Fund, andBeyond Phinda Private Game Reserve, and the Mun-Ya-Wana Conservancy. Collaring the hyenas enables Hunnicutt and his team to study how hyenas utilise the landscape both inside and outside of protected areas.

Using a cell phone signal, the collars transmit information about the hyena’s exact location, speed, and temperature every four hours.

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Taking teeth measurements © Wild Tomorrow Fund

The collared male is the first of 14 spotted hyenas of different ages, social rank and sex to be collared for the project across the Mun-Ya-Wana Conservancy, uMkhuze Game Reserve and the surrounding area. Over the next several years the MCSHP will examine how these animals move through areas with different levels of conservation protection, what they eat and how they interact with people, learning more about how to help this threatened population.

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© Wild Tomorrow Fund

Beyond Phinda Private Game Reserve, a part of the Mun-Ya-Wana Conservancy, is an ideal study site for spotted hyena since it is situated between local communities and farmlands, which are relatively unprotected habitat for hyenas, and the uMkhuze Game Reserve, a park that has been protected for over 100 years.

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Phinda Private Game Reserve © Wild Tomorrow Fund

“Spotted hyena move across the landscape, with vast territories and home ranges that cover both formal protected parks, private reserves, local communities and farms with commercial livestock in and around andBeyond Phinda,” says Simon Naylor, Reserve Manager &Beyond Phinda Private Game Reserve.

“This study will hopefully reveal more detailed information about the spotted hyena population in this part of Zululand. Outside these protected areas, these animals are coming into conflict with communities and commercial livestock farmers. The information gained will hopefully also advise how best to mitigate these conflicts and assist in the future survival of these much maligned and persecuted animals. I believe it is possible for all the different land users to co-habit the landscape with these animals. This study will assist us in finding the best solutions for this,” concludes Simon.

Watch the video below for more information about the Mun-Ya-Wana Conservancy Spotted Hyena Project

[video]“Spotted hyena move across the landscape, with vast territories and home ranges that cover both formal protected parks, private reserves, local communities and farms with commercial livestock in and around andBeyond Phinda,” says Simon Naylor, Reserve Manager &Beyond Phinda Private Game Reserve.

“This study will hopefully reveal more detailed information about the spotted hyena population in this part of Zululand. Outside these protected areas, these animals are coming into conflict with communities and commercial livestock farmers. The information gained will hopefully also advise how best to mitigate these conflicts and assist in the future survival of these much maligned and persecuted animals. I believe it is possible for all the different land users to co-habit the landscape with these animals. This study will assist us in finding the best solutions for this,” concludes Simon.

Watch the video below for more information about the Mun-Ya-Wana Conservancy Spotted Hyena Project

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The desire for equality must never exceed the demands of knowledge

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Re: Spotted Hyena

Post by Lisbeth » Wed Sep 19, 2018 11:05 am

WATCH: Eina! Hyena Takes A Bite From Buffalo's Balls

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Be prepared for silent screams as you watch a hyena take a long bite on a tired buffalo's nether regions after a fight with lions.

The shocking video taken at night was captured by freelance guide Sian Green and shared by Latest Sightings.

“This old buffalo bull, generally known as a 'dagga boy', was exhausted after a long fight with a pride of lions. Luckily for the buffalo, he beat the lions and survived the attack. It was all over for the night! Or so he thought."

“A very brave hyena must have heard the commotion and came to see what was going on. The hyena carefully approached the tired-out buffalo bull. Even though the buffalo thought he won against a pride of lions, Mother Nature wasn't done with him."
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Re: Spotted Hyena

Post by Lisbeth » Thu Oct 25, 2018 12:45 pm

Kruger hyenas steal the spotlight

Photos and text by Marli Potgieter

Hyena youngsters are curious, lively and full of beans, as these intimate photographs by Wild traveller Marli Potgieter prove. It’s no wonder the cubs stole her heart – but that’s not all the thieving little rascals made off with.

It’s no secret that Wild traveller Marli Potgieter has a bit of an obsession with spotted hyena. Whenever she’s spending time in the famous Kruger National Park, she makes it a priority to revisit all her favourite den sites. During a recent camping trip to Pretoriuskop Rest Camp, this avid hyena enthusiast was once again in her element.

She writes:

With the sun barely up, every day started off with a few hours at one of two den sites. On this particular day, we decided to go for an afternoon drive along the H1-1 main road. Judging from experience, hyena cubs are usually quite active from around four in the afternoon. We made a quick stop at Transport Dam where we found a lone elephant bull quenching his thirst.

When we arrived at the den, the little rascals were already at it with a total of nine hyenas ranging in all ages. The only adult supervision proved to be a very sleepy mom.

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Mom keeping an eye

With the vehicle’s engine off, we watched in awe as the cubs suckled, jumped, chewed thorny twigs and bullied one another. Before long, the curious and playful spotties decided to explore our car – a strange, big box carrying two nosy humans. Because we’d been spending so much time with them, the cubs were quite accustomed to us and our vehicle, which made for some close encounters.

Cubs might be small, but their strength should not be underestimated. Razor sharp teeth can cause serious damage. Like a chewed-up mud flap.

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Kruger-National-Park-spotted-hyena-Marli-Potgieter-2-min.jpg
Kruger-National-Park-spotted-hyena-Marli-Potgieter-2-min.jpg (28.92 KiB) Viewed 18 times
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Did you know? Hyena cubs are born with well-developed teeth and can fight quite viciously. In the case of female twins, it’s common for one sister to kill the other.

As the youngsters gathered around the vehicle, one particular hyena started to chew at the rear bumper. We started the engine a few times in an attempt to curb the mischief, but the hyena youngsters kept returning like naughty children. That’s when one of them – the largest of the lot – suddenly took off. It had something in its mouth…

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The culprits

We soon realised that one of the rubber covers from the tow bar had vanished. The spotted thief kept its distance, making sure to keep his new-found toy from the others. Of course, another youngster also wanted to share in the fun and it soon got hold of a second tow bar cover.

The duo seemed quite pleased with their accomplishments and as some of the others tried to join the game, a tug of war ensued. The two culprits wanted none of it and took off – rubber covers and all.
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Re: Spotted Hyena

Post by Richprins » Thu Oct 25, 2018 1:52 pm

Naughty hyenas! :X:

[O]
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