Plastic and other Environmental Dangerous Waste

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Richprins
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Re: Local celebs pledge to give up plastic bags

Post by Richprins » Wed Aug 08, 2018 5:16 pm

SANParks don't allow plastic bags in the shops, but obviously grocery products come in them. \O
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Re: Local celebs pledge to give up plastic bags

Post by Lisbeth » Wed Aug 08, 2018 6:17 pm

The worst are the hard transparent containers for veggies, fruit etc. You have to cut them to pieces in order to throw them away, if not the bin is full in a jiffy. I hate them 0=
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Re: Local celebs pledge to give up plastic bags

Post by Lisbeth » Fri Aug 10, 2018 1:40 pm

New Zealand to ban single-use plastic bags

By AFP• 10 August 2018

New Zealand became the latest country Friday to outlaw single-use plastic shopping bags, with Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern saying they will be phased out over the next year as a "meaningful step" towards reducing pollution.

New Zealand uses “hundreds of millions” of single-use plastic bags each year, many of which end up harming marine life, Ardern said.

“We need to be far smarter in the way we manage waste and this is a good start,” she said.

“We’re phasing-out single-use plastic bags so we can better look after our environment and safeguard New Zealand’s clean, green reputation.”

Ardern said her coalition government, which includes the Green Party, was facing up to environmental challenges and “just like climate change, we’re taking meaningful steps to reduce plastics pollution so we don’t pass this problem to future generations.”

Single-use plastic bags are among the most common items found in coastal litter in New Zealand and the environmental group Greenpeace welcomed the decision to outlaw them.

“This could be a major leap forward in turning the tide on ocean plastic pollution and an important first step in protecting marine life such as sea turtles and whales, from the growing plastic waste epidemic,” Greenpeace Oceans Campaigner Emily Hunter said.

A United Nations report in June said up to five trillion grocery bags are used globally each year, which is nearly 10 million plastic bags per minute.

“If tied together, all these plastic bags could be wrapped around the world seven times every hour” and like most plastic garbage barely any is recycled, said Erik Solheim, head of UN Environment.

The UN said more than 60 countries had introduced bans and levies on single-use plastic items like bags.

But better waste management, financial incentives to change consumers’ buying habits and research into alternative materials were needed to make any real change, it added.
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Re: Local celebs pledge to give up plastic bags

Post by Lisbeth » Tue Sep 11, 2018 2:19 pm

Carlsberg cans plastic rings to cut waste

08.09.2018 AFP

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Danish brewer Carlsberg said it was ditching the plastic rings that hold together its six-packs, launching a glued "Snap Pack" aimed at cutting waste and emissions.

Plastic rings pose a serious threat to wildlife and are choking landfill sites, and together with plastic bags are linked to increased ocean pollution.

Carlsberg said its new solution, where the cans are bonded together, would reduce plastic waste globally by more than 1 200 tonnes a year, equivalent to 60 million plastic bags.

The initiative will "reduce the amount of plastic used in traditional multi-packs by up to 76%", the brewer said.

Carlsberg is the latest company to take steps to reduce its plastic packaging, following other multinationals such as Ikea, McDonalds, Starbucks and Adidas.

From 2006 to 2016, global plastic output rose from 245 million to 348 million tonnes, according to the PlasticsEurope trade association.

Anti-plastics campaigning has been vigorous in Europe in recent years, and the EU in May proposed a bloc-wide ban on single-use plastics but did not set a deadline.

Only 9% of the nine billion tonnes of plastic produced globally to date has been recycled, a recent UN report said.

Some 12 million tonnes per year, mostly in the form of single-use packaging, are dumped into the world's oceans, creating an ecological nightmare, according to Greenpeace.
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Re: Plastic and other Environmental Dangerous Waste

Post by Lisbeth » Tue Sep 11, 2018 2:40 pm

International Coastal Clean-Up Day

Join global action with coastal clean-ups in and around Nelson Mandela Bay

It’s International Coastal Clean-Up Day on Saturday September 15, with various groups arranging clean-ups not only in Port Elizabeth but around the world.

On this date, thousands of tons of waste are removed in a single day by tens of thousands of volunteers globally.

“Last year, in Port Elizabeth, we removed more than 12 tons around our coastline,” said Tim and Isobel Douglas-Jones, who are among those who regularly go on clean-ups.

Here is the list of clean-ups organised in and around Port Elizabeth in 2018, with all most welcome to join.

“This year we will also collect data on the Dirty Dozen, the 12 items most found on clean-ups, to compare between beaches. If anyone is interested to participate in the study, please contact me,” said Tim. “Together we can make a huge difference.”

Volunteers from the Sustainable Seas Trust and Nelson Mandela University Green Campus Initiative will be there to assist. The Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality and Plastics SA will provide bags for most of the clean-ups.

- Colchester: Organised by the local community. Contact: Dennis Spicer, 082-937-7288
- Bluewater Bay: Organised by the Zwartkops Conservancy. Meet at 9.30am at the BWB swimming beach, at the bottom of Weinronk Way. Bags provided but bring gloves. Contact: Jenny Rump, 082-853-0700
- Motherwell storm water canal: Organised by the Zwartkops Conservancy. Meet at 9.30am at Tyinira St in Motherwell, just off the M17. Bags and gloves provided. Contact: Luthando Gxowa, 083-228-7325 or Jenny Rump, 082-853-0700
- Swartkops River by kayak: Organised by Schotia Safaris. See details on Schotia's Facebook page
- Baakens Valley: Organised by Valley Crag. Meet at 9.30am at Valley Crag Climbing Gym. See details on Valley Crag's Facebook page
- Hobie Beach: Organised by ProDive. Meet at 12.30pm by the pier. Bags provided but bring gloves. Contact: Linda, 079-352-0965
- Cape Recife: Organised jointly by Sanccob and Wessa. Meet at 9.30am at Sanccob. Bags provided. Contact: Luc Hosten, 072-265-4073
- Schoenies: Organised by the Port Elizabeth Permaculture Group. Meet at 9.30am in front of the Sacramento restaurant. Bags provided but bring gloves. Contact: Krag Lohry, 083-290-0414
- Maitlands beach: Organised by Raggy Charters. Meet at 9.30am at the car park. Bags provided but bring gloves. Contact: Lloyd Edwards, 084-552-2277
- Blue Horizon Bay: Organised by the local community. Contact: johann@sapicasso.co.za
- Seaview, Beachview shoreline: Meet at the bus stop/parking opposite the old Seaview Hotel. 9.30am. Bags and gloves will be supplied.
- Brighton Beach Community Clean-Up: Organised by The Waste Trade Company and Project Nelson Mandela Bay from 9am to noon. There is also a surfing demonstration.

In addition, the beach between Coega harbour and Sundays River will be cleaned by the 4x4 Club Association, St George’s Beach by Coca Cola, Kings Beach by Woolworths and 500 registered pupils, Pollok Beach and Flat Rocks by the South African National Defence Force, and the open field across Eastern Cape Motors dealership on William Moffett by Eastern Cape Motors, who will be joining the effort during the week.

The Sustainable Seas Trust has also organised several schools, such as St Colmcille High School, Collegiate Junior School, Woodridge Primary School, DF Malherbe and Kwezi Lomso, to also participate all along the week.

“This list is not necessarily exhaustive, it is what we have been able to glean to date. If we hear of others, we will pass on the information. Wessa is joining with Sanccob at Cape Recife. It is exciting to see the extent of involvement!” said Tim and Isobel.
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Re: Plastic and other Environmental Dangerous Waste

Post by Richprins » Tue Sep 11, 2018 5:39 pm

\O \O
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Re: Plastic and other Environmental Dangerous Waste

Post by Lisbeth » Tue Sep 11, 2018 7:06 pm

It is funny to see how man gets clever, when it comes to invent something in order to avoid the usual easy way lol \O
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Re: Plastic and other Environmental Dangerous Waste

Post by Flutterby » Wed Sep 12, 2018 9:52 am

I told Lis that I couldn't believe the amount of plastic usage in some parts of Sicily. We stayed with some family at their holiday home at the sea and there they only use plastic plates and cups. Everyday there would be a bag full of plastic waste! :O^ At a lot of cafes and restaurants your drinks are in plastic cups, even the espresso!! 0*\ 0*\

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Re: Plastic and other Environmental Dangerous Waste

Post by Lisbeth » Wed Sep 12, 2018 10:20 am

When it comes to civility in Italy, only Calabria can beat Sicily O** lol
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Re: Plastic and other Environmental Dangerous Waste

Post by Lisbeth » Wed Sep 19, 2018 11:16 am

It is possible to be part of a plastic free world

MELANIE VERWOERD - 19.09.2018

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In June I saw another tragic story of a sperm whale that died in Thailand. Veterinarians told the harrowing story of how much she suffered as she vomited up five plastic bags, while they tried in vain to rescue her.

During her autopsy they found another 80 plastic bags amounting to 8kg in her stomach. She got so blocked up by the bags that she could not eat and eventually starved to death.

This was the last (plastic) straw for me. I immediately committed to move to a plastic free life – or as close to one as I can be. About two months later, I am almost there, although it has been much more challenging than I initially thought.

I have to admit that at first I became totally overwhelmed. Once you become aware of plastic you realise just how it has invaded every aspect of our lives even though it is often totally unnecessary. Why, for example, do we need to wrap toilet paper in plastic? Or vegetables such as potatoes, onions and beetroots? Why do we need the little plastic covers on the box of tissues? I could go on and on.

Some of the steps I took only involved small changes. Saying no to straws, never using plastic shopping bags, always having a travel mug and water bottle in the car and handbag… these were merely a question of discipline.

Other grocery items proved more difficult. I now buy only loose fruit and vegetables, but of course have to ensure that those who weigh or pack them do not pop them into those little flimsy plastic bags. The problem is that unless I go to my local community market the plastic free variety is limited.

Other produce like rice, pasta and milk had me at a loss for a while. Then I discovered the lovely Nude Foods Supermarket in Cape Town. The owners are committed to a plastic free world. You buy or take your own glass containers and everything is weighed. Milk and cream are also sold in glass containers which they will take back if you end up with too many. Let’s hope that similar shops will appear all over the country.

So that was my grocery cupboard sorted.

Then I tackled my cosmetics. A bit of internet research led me to a range of environmentally friendly skin products called Eco Diva. I love the products but more importantly they were happy to refill any containers and gave me discount for re-using the containers.

What my two months showed me was that with a bit of effort and creativity it was possible to radically reduce my plastic consumption. I once calculated that I saved 21 bags on a busy day of grocery and clothes shopping.

It therefore came as no surprise to me that that South Africans consume on average 2kg of plastic per person per day (almost the same as the USA), making us the 11th biggest plastic polluter in the world.

Being committed to eradicating plastic actually made me far more conscious of my shopping habits and even though the market and Nude Foods shop might be more expensive per unit than the average supermarket, I found that I bought less and wasted less, thus ending up saving overall.

Despite my best efforts I’m not 100% plastic free. My dog’s raw food still comes in plastic pouches and I don’t think that will change easily. And, of course, I have plastic in my car, phone, laptop, etc. That, I have no way of solving but then again I don’t throw any of those in my bin on a weekly basis.

It is true that every one of us can make a huge difference and supermarkets will change if enough of us protest and complain about the unnecessary use of plastic.

However, to make a real difference we urgently need regulations by the government. It was Valli Moosa who years ago took the courageous step of introducing a levy on plastic shopping bags. At the time consumers and the industry shouted blue murder. Yet, we all adjusted – to the point where we don’t even notice the 55 cents anymore. So it is clearly time for more stringent regulations.

Not to punish people or the industry, but because it is the right and necessary thing to do. Eight million tons of plastic waste is deposited into our oceans every year – equivalent to one dump-truck of plastic dropped into the oceans each minute. It is estimated that at this current rate, by 2050 there will be more plastic by weight in the ocean than fish.

According to WWF, 94% of litter washing up on South African beaches is made of plastic, of which 77% is packaging. The amount of litter washing up daily in Table Bay has tripled from 1994 to 2011, far outstripping the 60% growth in Cape Town’s human population over the same period.

If we don’t do anything our oceans will die and in addition to the tragedy of losing marine life the economic benefit from fishery and tourism will be destroyed.

It is also important to note that increasingly micro-plastic is finding its way into our water supply and into our bodies, which could have devastating long-term health implications for all of us.

Of course the industry will put up a massive fight, but government should not let that deter them. They should look at countries like Rwanda, Bangladesh, China, Taiwan, Macedonia and Kenya who amongst other banned plastic bags completely.

Humans are adjustable and inventive. We don’t need these single use plastics – we can find other alternatives, as I have proven in my own household. The whales and other marine animals have no options when it comes to their environment, nor can they adjust their lifestyles to accommodate the mountains of plastic they have to swim in.

If we want our grandchildren to still be able to look at whales and penguins outside of museums we have to urgently take drastic action.

- Melanie Verwoerd is a former ANC MP and South African Ambassador to Ireland.
"Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world." Nelson Mandela
The desire for equality must never exceed the demands of knowledge

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