Lion Bones export Approved/Blood Lions

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Re: Lion Bones export Approved/Blood Lions

Post by Richprins » Wed Aug 22, 2018 2:43 pm

The foreign volunteers pay to work. It is a major source of income on which centres depend. Locals will not work for free.
Please check Needs Attention pre-booking: https://africawild-forum.com/viewtopic.php?f=322&t=596

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Re: Lion Bones export Approved/Blood Lions

Post by Lisbeth » Fri Aug 24, 2018 10:08 am

Largest lion bone carrier, Singapore Airlines, stops cargo from South Africa

2018-08-23 11:00 - Louzel Lombard Steyn

The largest airline exporter of lion bones from South Africa to Southeast Asia will no longer support SA's bone trade from captive-bred big cats.

Following a recent internal review, which took into account "increasing concerns around the world" regarding the lion bone industry, Singapore Airlines said it would discontinue the carriage of lion bones as cargo.

In 2017 Singapore Airlines was the sole airline moving supposed lion bones from South Africa to Southeast Asia, according to the recent EMS Foundation and Ban Animal Trading report, ‘The Extinction Business – South Africa’s ‘Lion’ Bone Trade’.

Singapore Airlines cargo manager for Africa and the Middle East, Adil Nunis, confirmed that the company's new position on the matter saying that "moving forward, SIA will not allow the carriage of lion bone shipments on all flights".

The airline's decision to distance itself from the damned industry will have far-reaching effects, especially considering a new analysis of global wildlife trafficking seizures in the air transport sector. The report, ‘In Plane Sight: Wildlife Trafficking in the Air Transport Sector’, produced by the Center for Advanced Defense Studies as part of the USAID Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species (ROUTES) Partnership, revealed the principal role airlines play in the endangered wildlife black market.

Singapore Airlines Cargo is the ninth largest international cargo carrier and a major link between SA and the East, specifically.

To date, 89 major airlines have signed the 2016 United for Wildlife Buckingham Palace Declaration, aimed at reducing the illegal trafficking of wildlife in general. The cargo of lion bone, however, is a legal practice in South Africa and thus would not affect the airlines' oath to reduce 'illegal trafficking'.

“Airlines play a major role in perpetuating the misery of wild animals caught up in international trade,” Michele Pickover, EMS Foundation Director, says. “Our research clearly shows that the legal trade is part of the illegal trade - they cannot be separated.

“Just because something is legal does not make it legitimate or justifiable. Airlines need to acknowledge their damaging role, proactively inform themselves of the facts and work much more closely with NGOs such as ourselves to ensure that their industry is conducted in a more ethical and transparent manner.”

Jon Godson, Assistant Director of Environment at the International Air Transport Association (IATA), says in the ‘In Plane Sight’ report that airlines are starting to recognize the need to combat wildlife trafficking and are stepping up as leaders in this global effort. Singapore Airlines' decision not to support SA's legal export quota of 1500 lion bone skeletons is just this - a step up.

(Source: Conservation Action Trust)
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Re: Lion Bones export Approved/Blood Lions

Post by Lisbeth » Mon Aug 27, 2018 10:19 am

Animal rights body sees 'glimmer of hope' after captive lion breeding colloquium

2018-08-24 12:02
Jenna Etheridge


Animal rights body Four Paws South Africa has expressed hope about the future of captive-bred lions after Parliament's Portfolio Committee for Environment hosted a colloquium this week.

The event, entitled "Captive Lion Breeding for Hunting in South Africa: Harming or Promoting the Conservation Image of the Country", took place on Tuesday and Wednesday.

Four Paws country director Fiona Miles said on Thursday that the colloquium was well attended.

"It has been 21 years since the Cook Report first exposed this atrocious industry and, whilst we never expected that one colloquium would result in the immediate banning of the canned hunting industry, comments from members of the portfolio committee, including its chairperson, leaves us with the sense that for first time, government is taking note of the negative impact that this industry is having on South Africa's international reputation and also the impact it is having on the welfare of these animals."

Miles said the importance of providing the lions with protection could not be underestimated. Figures quoted at the event placed the local captive lion population at between 7 500 and 12 500 animals on around 290 breeding farms.

Last month, the Department of Environmental Affairs announced it had approved an annual quota of 1 500 lion skeletons for export, based on new evidence from a research project on the lion bone trade in SA.

Spokesperson Albi Modise said at the time that the study revealed, among other things, that there had been no discernible increase in the poaching of wild lions in the country, although there appeared to be an increase in the poaching of captive-bred lions for body parts.

Opening the colloquium, committee chairperson Philemon Mapulane said Parliament was committed to working with the department during its budget vote debate in May.

The commitment had been to facilitate a national dialogue on the breeding of lions in captivity for hunting and the lion bone and skeleton trade.

The committee said in a statement that diverse views had emerged during the event.

"The majority of biodiversity and conservation organisations made a call for a total ban of captive lion breeding for hunting purposes. On the other hand, there are organisations that advocate for stricter laws and regulations at which the practice could be done."

Mapulane assured in the statement that whatever emerged out of the event, "It will be followed up by the committee with the sheer tenacity of a hungry lion chasing its prey."

"The committee will accept and interrogate all views presented and make recommendations to be considered by the National Assembly for consideration and adoption."

Miles responded: "We can only hope that the optimism generated inside the room is carried forward in their recommendations and ultimately results in protection for all lions [wild and captive] that call South Africa home".
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Re: Lion Bones export Approved/Blood Lions

Post by Lisbeth » Wed Aug 29, 2018 11:11 am

Captive lion breeding in Parliament’s sights amid global ‘outcry’

BY LOUZEL LOMBARD STEYN - 21 AUGUST 2018 - NEWS24

“MPs must be concerned when reputable conservation agencies turn their backs on SA and deplore its policies [regarding captive lion breeding],” said Mohlopi Mapulane, Portfolio Committee on Environmental Affairs chair.

Mapulane emphasized that there are questions regarding the scientific viability of captive-breeding lions for the purpose of hunting and using their parts.

Global ‘outcry’

The two-day captive breeding lion for hunting colloquium, currently underway in Cape Town, is aimed at addressing the global ‘outcry’ against the industry and South Africa’s role in wildlife conservation.

To coincide with the start of the event, Humane Society International (HSI) Africa released the outcome of a nationwide poll, showing an overwhelming public concern about the lion breeding industry.

More than two thirds of South Africans indicated that they think lion breeding is harmful to the country’s international reputation. HSI’s findings echo another new report published by the South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA), which revealed that the captive lion breeding industry revenue represents less than 2% of South Africa’s tourism revenue and that the lion breeding industry damages South Africa’s reputation as tourist destination.

‘Negative reputation effect’

“The conservation value of predator breeding is zero; the economic value is minimal and undermines South Africa’s tourism brand value. The negative reputation effect is real, and too often ignored,” says Ross Harvey, author of the SAIIA report.

Reports such as the recent ‘The Extinction Business: South Africa’s ‘Lion’ Bone Trade’, as well as the Born Free Foundation’s report, “Cash before Conservation, an overview of the breeding of lions for hunting and bone trade” review the damning effect this regulation has had for South Africa as a leading wildlife conservation and tourism destination.

Organisations favouring the captive-breeding of lions, such as the South African Predator Association (SAPA), are of the opinion that “the captive lion industry in South Africa is a well-regulated, manageable industry that contributes way more positively to South Africa than negatively,” as stated by SAPA’s President, MK Nematandani.

The Portfolio Committee on Environmental Affairs will then advise whether legislation on regulating the controversial practice is needed.

Read original article: https://www.news24.com/Green/shockwidll ... y-20180821
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Re: Lion Bones export Approved/Blood Lions

Post by Lisbeth » Fri Sep 07, 2018 3:29 pm

https://conservationaction.co.za/media- ... -dea-daff/

BY LOUZEL LOMBARD STEYN - 4 SEPTEMBER 2018 - IAFRICA -

Image
Captive Bred Lions destined for canned hunting or slaughter for their bones are not protected by South Africa’s animal welfare laws. The Departments responsible for their welfare and regulating the industry are simply ‘passing the buck’.

According to Karen Trendler of the Wildlife Trade and Trafficking unit of the National Council of SPCAs (NSPCA), the welfare of South Africa’s captive-bred lions is falling through the cracks.

“The Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF) is mandated to oversee and administer the Animal Protection Act, under which the welfare of animals falls. The Department of Environmental Affairs (DEA), again, makes policy for wildlife and wildlife trade, like lion bone trade. But the conflict of mandate for the welfare of captive and farmed wildlife, including the welfare of captive bred lions, remains unresolved.
“The buck is passed backwards and forwards. There is just not adequate regulation or any control,” Trendler says.
The Departments are aware of the overlap and conflict of mandate but it is not being addressed. While DEA increased the export quota for lion skeletons from 800 to 1500 for 2018, DAFF states “there are currently no abattoirs registered for the slaughter of lions.”

How, where and when these captive-bred lions are killed for their bones is a mess neither Departments want to dirty their hands with.

“DEA and DAFF are fully aware of the unresolved conflict on welfare mandate – which just adds to our concerns, that in spite of repeated requests and appeals to address and resolve the mandate issue, permits for breeding and the lion quota are issued in the absence of adequate regulations on breeding, keeping and slaughter,” Trendler says.

The NSPCA is also not getting cooperation from the relevant departments or people in the industry in order to execute their duties. “We have to file PAIA (Promotion of Access to Information Act) applications to get information on where the facilities are, in order to inspect them,” Trendler says.

“We are legally mandated to ensure the welfare of all animals in SA, and yet the industry sees us as the enemy.”

No action from DEA, DAFF

Mark Jones from the Born Free Foundation, presenting at a recent parliamentary colloquium on captive lion breeding, echoed the NSPCA’s concerns saying existing legislation “was never intended to deal with the welfare of wild animals bred and hunted or slaughtered in captivity.”

Jones also highlighted DAFF and DEA’s lax attitudes in regulating the industry. He inquired why the Departments had not even formulated draft regulations when they were requested to do so by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) at the World Conservation Congress in 2016.

DAFF’s Joel Mamabolo says while there are no specific regulations, “there is work in process by DAFF on developing the guidelines on the welfare of captive lions in South Africa.” Once drafted, the bill would still need to undergo the consultation and legislation processes and once promulgated, its regulations could only be implemented – a process which typically takes at least two years.

In the meantime, without adequate consultation , DEA almost doubled the quota based on an interim report which has been criticised extensively by conservation groups, specifically regarding the lack of scientific data to support the decision.

DEA has increased the lion skeleton export quota to 1500, perpetuating the unregulated slaughter slaughter of captive bred lions.

DEA fails to produce science behind quotas

When the previous quota for 800 lion skeletons was announced last year, the NSPCA filed a motion against DEA for a legal review of the quota. The South African Predator Association (SAPA), which the hinting of captive bred lions , joined DEA in opposing the NSPCA’s motion.

Included in the NSPCA‘s concerns are “the welfare issues, a lack of regulation and the rationality for the basis of issuing the quota,” Trendler says.

Negotiations and the legal processes are underway and the NSPCA says it will take whatever action necessary going forward.

When probed about the welfare of these animals, DEA responded saying captive-bred lions fell under DAFF’s mandate‚ and was therefore not the DEA’s concern.

It was revealed at the recent parliamentary colloquium were that there are around 8 000 lions in captive facilities in South Africa at the moment.

Read full article: https://www.iafrica.com/welfare-of-sas- ... -dea-daff/
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