Lion Bones export Approved/Blood Lions

User avatar
Richprins
Committee Member
Posts: 57086
Joined: Sat May 19, 2012 3:52 pm
Location: NELSPRUIT

Re: Lion Bones export Approved/Blood Lions

Post by Richprins » Wed Aug 22, 2018 2:43 pm

The foreign volunteers pay to work. It is a major source of income on which centres depend. Locals will not work for free.
Please check Needs Attention pre-booking: https://africawild-forum.com/viewtopic.php?f=322&t=596

User avatar
Lisbeth
Global Moderator
Posts: 45088
Joined: Sat May 19, 2012 12:31 pm
Country: Switzerland
Location: Lugano, Switzerland

Re: Lion Bones export Approved/Blood Lions

Post by Lisbeth » Fri Aug 24, 2018 10:08 am

Largest lion bone carrier, Singapore Airlines, stops cargo from South Africa

2018-08-23 11:00 - Louzel Lombard Steyn

The largest airline exporter of lion bones from South Africa to Southeast Asia will no longer support SA's bone trade from captive-bred big cats.

Following a recent internal review, which took into account "increasing concerns around the world" regarding the lion bone industry, Singapore Airlines said it would discontinue the carriage of lion bones as cargo.

In 2017 Singapore Airlines was the sole airline moving supposed lion bones from South Africa to Southeast Asia, according to the recent EMS Foundation and Ban Animal Trading report, ‘The Extinction Business – South Africa’s ‘Lion’ Bone Trade’.

Singapore Airlines cargo manager for Africa and the Middle East, Adil Nunis, confirmed that the company's new position on the matter saying that "moving forward, SIA will not allow the carriage of lion bone shipments on all flights".

The airline's decision to distance itself from the damned industry will have far-reaching effects, especially considering a new analysis of global wildlife trafficking seizures in the air transport sector. The report, ‘In Plane Sight: Wildlife Trafficking in the Air Transport Sector’, produced by the Center for Advanced Defense Studies as part of the USAID Reducing Opportunities for Unlawful Transport of Endangered Species (ROUTES) Partnership, revealed the principal role airlines play in the endangered wildlife black market.

Singapore Airlines Cargo is the ninth largest international cargo carrier and a major link between SA and the East, specifically.

To date, 89 major airlines have signed the 2016 United for Wildlife Buckingham Palace Declaration, aimed at reducing the illegal trafficking of wildlife in general. The cargo of lion bone, however, is a legal practice in South Africa and thus would not affect the airlines' oath to reduce 'illegal trafficking'.

“Airlines play a major role in perpetuating the misery of wild animals caught up in international trade,” Michele Pickover, EMS Foundation Director, says. “Our research clearly shows that the legal trade is part of the illegal trade - they cannot be separated.

“Just because something is legal does not make it legitimate or justifiable. Airlines need to acknowledge their damaging role, proactively inform themselves of the facts and work much more closely with NGOs such as ourselves to ensure that their industry is conducted in a more ethical and transparent manner.”

Jon Godson, Assistant Director of Environment at the International Air Transport Association (IATA), says in the ‘In Plane Sight’ report that airlines are starting to recognize the need to combat wildlife trafficking and are stepping up as leaders in this global effort. Singapore Airlines' decision not to support SA's legal export quota of 1500 lion bone skeletons is just this - a step up.

(Source: Conservation Action Trust)
"Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world." Nelson Mandela
The desire for equality must never exceed the demands of knowledge

User avatar
Lisbeth
Global Moderator
Posts: 45088
Joined: Sat May 19, 2012 12:31 pm
Country: Switzerland
Location: Lugano, Switzerland

Re: Lion Bones export Approved/Blood Lions

Post by Lisbeth » Mon Aug 27, 2018 10:19 am

Animal rights body sees 'glimmer of hope' after captive lion breeding colloquium

2018-08-24 12:02
Jenna Etheridge


Animal rights body Four Paws South Africa has expressed hope about the future of captive-bred lions after Parliament's Portfolio Committee for Environment hosted a colloquium this week.

The event, entitled "Captive Lion Breeding for Hunting in South Africa: Harming or Promoting the Conservation Image of the Country", took place on Tuesday and Wednesday.

Four Paws country director Fiona Miles said on Thursday that the colloquium was well attended.

"It has been 21 years since the Cook Report first exposed this atrocious industry and, whilst we never expected that one colloquium would result in the immediate banning of the canned hunting industry, comments from members of the portfolio committee, including its chairperson, leaves us with the sense that for first time, government is taking note of the negative impact that this industry is having on South Africa's international reputation and also the impact it is having on the welfare of these animals."

Miles said the importance of providing the lions with protection could not be underestimated. Figures quoted at the event placed the local captive lion population at between 7 500 and 12 500 animals on around 290 breeding farms.

Last month, the Department of Environmental Affairs announced it had approved an annual quota of 1 500 lion skeletons for export, based on new evidence from a research project on the lion bone trade in SA.

Spokesperson Albi Modise said at the time that the study revealed, among other things, that there had been no discernible increase in the poaching of wild lions in the country, although there appeared to be an increase in the poaching of captive-bred lions for body parts.

Opening the colloquium, committee chairperson Philemon Mapulane said Parliament was committed to working with the department during its budget vote debate in May.

The commitment had been to facilitate a national dialogue on the breeding of lions in captivity for hunting and the lion bone and skeleton trade.

The committee said in a statement that diverse views had emerged during the event.

"The majority of biodiversity and conservation organisations made a call for a total ban of captive lion breeding for hunting purposes. On the other hand, there are organisations that advocate for stricter laws and regulations at which the practice could be done."

Mapulane assured in the statement that whatever emerged out of the event, "It will be followed up by the committee with the sheer tenacity of a hungry lion chasing its prey."

"The committee will accept and interrogate all views presented and make recommendations to be considered by the National Assembly for consideration and adoption."

Miles responded: "We can only hope that the optimism generated inside the room is carried forward in their recommendations and ultimately results in protection for all lions [wild and captive] that call South Africa home".
"Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world." Nelson Mandela
The desire for equality must never exceed the demands of knowledge

User avatar
Lisbeth
Global Moderator
Posts: 45088
Joined: Sat May 19, 2012 12:31 pm
Country: Switzerland
Location: Lugano, Switzerland

Re: Lion Bones export Approved/Blood Lions

Post by Lisbeth » Wed Aug 29, 2018 11:11 am

Captive lion breeding in Parliament’s sights amid global ‘outcry’

BY LOUZEL LOMBARD STEYN - 21 AUGUST 2018 - NEWS24

“MPs must be concerned when reputable conservation agencies turn their backs on SA and deplore its policies [regarding captive lion breeding],” said Mohlopi Mapulane, Portfolio Committee on Environmental Affairs chair.

Mapulane emphasized that there are questions regarding the scientific viability of captive-breeding lions for the purpose of hunting and using their parts.

Global ‘outcry’

The two-day captive breeding lion for hunting colloquium, currently underway in Cape Town, is aimed at addressing the global ‘outcry’ against the industry and South Africa’s role in wildlife conservation.

To coincide with the start of the event, Humane Society International (HSI) Africa released the outcome of a nationwide poll, showing an overwhelming public concern about the lion breeding industry.

More than two thirds of South Africans indicated that they think lion breeding is harmful to the country’s international reputation. HSI’s findings echo another new report published by the South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA), which revealed that the captive lion breeding industry revenue represents less than 2% of South Africa’s tourism revenue and that the lion breeding industry damages South Africa’s reputation as tourist destination.

‘Negative reputation effect’

“The conservation value of predator breeding is zero; the economic value is minimal and undermines South Africa’s tourism brand value. The negative reputation effect is real, and too often ignored,” says Ross Harvey, author of the SAIIA report.

Reports such as the recent ‘The Extinction Business: South Africa’s ‘Lion’ Bone Trade’, as well as the Born Free Foundation’s report, “Cash before Conservation, an overview of the breeding of lions for hunting and bone trade” review the damning effect this regulation has had for South Africa as a leading wildlife conservation and tourism destination.

Organisations favouring the captive-breeding of lions, such as the South African Predator Association (SAPA), are of the opinion that “the captive lion industry in South Africa is a well-regulated, manageable industry that contributes way more positively to South Africa than negatively,” as stated by SAPA’s President, MK Nematandani.

The Portfolio Committee on Environmental Affairs will then advise whether legislation on regulating the controversial practice is needed.

Read original article: https://www.news24.com/Green/shockwidll ... y-20180821
"Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world." Nelson Mandela
The desire for equality must never exceed the demands of knowledge

User avatar
Lisbeth
Global Moderator
Posts: 45088
Joined: Sat May 19, 2012 12:31 pm
Country: Switzerland
Location: Lugano, Switzerland

Re: Lion Bones export Approved/Blood Lions

Post by Lisbeth » Fri Sep 07, 2018 3:29 pm

https://conservationaction.co.za/media- ... -dea-daff/

BY LOUZEL LOMBARD STEYN - 4 SEPTEMBER 2018 - IAFRICA -

Image
Captive Bred Lions destined for canned hunting or slaughter for their bones are not protected by South Africa’s animal welfare laws. The Departments responsible for their welfare and regulating the industry are simply ‘passing the buck’.

According to Karen Trendler of the Wildlife Trade and Trafficking unit of the National Council of SPCAs (NSPCA), the welfare of South Africa’s captive-bred lions is falling through the cracks.

“The Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF) is mandated to oversee and administer the Animal Protection Act, under which the welfare of animals falls. The Department of Environmental Affairs (DEA), again, makes policy for wildlife and wildlife trade, like lion bone trade. But the conflict of mandate for the welfare of captive and farmed wildlife, including the welfare of captive bred lions, remains unresolved.
“The buck is passed backwards and forwards. There is just not adequate regulation or any control,” Trendler says.
The Departments are aware of the overlap and conflict of mandate but it is not being addressed. While DEA increased the export quota for lion skeletons from 800 to 1500 for 2018, DAFF states “there are currently no abattoirs registered for the slaughter of lions.”

How, where and when these captive-bred lions are killed for their bones is a mess neither Departments want to dirty their hands with.

“DEA and DAFF are fully aware of the unresolved conflict on welfare mandate – which just adds to our concerns, that in spite of repeated requests and appeals to address and resolve the mandate issue, permits for breeding and the lion quota are issued in the absence of adequate regulations on breeding, keeping and slaughter,” Trendler says.

The NSPCA is also not getting cooperation from the relevant departments or people in the industry in order to execute their duties. “We have to file PAIA (Promotion of Access to Information Act) applications to get information on where the facilities are, in order to inspect them,” Trendler says.

“We are legally mandated to ensure the welfare of all animals in SA, and yet the industry sees us as the enemy.”

No action from DEA, DAFF

Mark Jones from the Born Free Foundation, presenting at a recent parliamentary colloquium on captive lion breeding, echoed the NSPCA’s concerns saying existing legislation “was never intended to deal with the welfare of wild animals bred and hunted or slaughtered in captivity.”

Jones also highlighted DAFF and DEA’s lax attitudes in regulating the industry. He inquired why the Departments had not even formulated draft regulations when they were requested to do so by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) at the World Conservation Congress in 2016.

DAFF’s Joel Mamabolo says while there are no specific regulations, “there is work in process by DAFF on developing the guidelines on the welfare of captive lions in South Africa.” Once drafted, the bill would still need to undergo the consultation and legislation processes and once promulgated, its regulations could only be implemented – a process which typically takes at least two years.

In the meantime, without adequate consultation , DEA almost doubled the quota based on an interim report which has been criticised extensively by conservation groups, specifically regarding the lack of scientific data to support the decision.

DEA has increased the lion skeleton export quota to 1500, perpetuating the unregulated slaughter slaughter of captive bred lions.

DEA fails to produce science behind quotas

When the previous quota for 800 lion skeletons was announced last year, the NSPCA filed a motion against DEA for a legal review of the quota. The South African Predator Association (SAPA), which the hinting of captive bred lions , joined DEA in opposing the NSPCA’s motion.

Included in the NSPCA‘s concerns are “the welfare issues, a lack of regulation and the rationality for the basis of issuing the quota,” Trendler says.

Negotiations and the legal processes are underway and the NSPCA says it will take whatever action necessary going forward.

When probed about the welfare of these animals, DEA responded saying captive-bred lions fell under DAFF’s mandate‚ and was therefore not the DEA’s concern.

It was revealed at the recent parliamentary colloquium were that there are around 8 000 lions in captive facilities in South Africa at the moment.

Read full article: https://www.iafrica.com/welfare-of-sas- ... -dea-daff/
"Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world." Nelson Mandela
The desire for equality must never exceed the demands of knowledge

User avatar
Richprins
Committee Member
Posts: 57086
Joined: Sat May 19, 2012 3:52 pm
Location: NELSPRUIT

Re: Lion Bones export Approved/Blood Lions

Post by Richprins » Thu Sep 27, 2018 10:01 am

Suspend trade in lion bones, NSPCA pleads in interdict

Amanda Watson

Image
A captive lion sadly peers from his prison of chains and bars, longing for the freedom of the jungle. Picture: iStock

There appears to be an increase in poaching of captive bred lions for body parts, while wild lions in Mozambique are under increasing threat.

The National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (NSPCA) has launched an urgent interdict application against the minister of environmental affairs, the SA Predator Association (Sapa), and the MECs of economic development and environment in Limpopo, North West, Gauteng, and Free State to suspend the trade in lion bones.

Karen Trendler, NSPCA wildlife trade and trafficking manager, said: “We had two legal processes running. When the quota for 800 lion skeletons for 2017 was announced, we asked for a review. While that was still going through the court process – and it’s still going ahead – the quota for 1 500 lion skeletons was announced.

“Based on the cruel slaughter we’ve seen through the SPCAs, it was procedurally incorrect. There are risks to wild populations which lead to criminal syndicates.

“[After] all of the issues were highlighted at the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species, we felt we had tried everything over a number of years to address the issue and when the 1 500 quota was announced, we had no option but to launch an interdict.”

Image
Lion skeletons being hung out to dry. Picture: Bloodlion.org

Earlier this year, the department of environmental affairs said: “The 2018 export quota was based on new evidence from a research project established by the SA National Biodiversity Institute in collaboration with the University of the Witwatersrand, Oxford University, and the University of Kent that analyses and monitors the lion bone trade in South Africa”.

The department said the study reported a growing stockpile of lion bones, and alleged there had been “no discernible increase in poaching of wild lions in South Africa, though there appears to be an increase in poaching of captive bred lions for body parts – heads, faces, paws and claws”.

In contrast, the Endangered Wildlife Trust said wild lions in southern Africa “specifically Mozambique, have been under increasing threat for their parts”.

The trust’s Dr Kelly Marnewick said: “The Greater Limpopo Carnivore Programme has recorded an escalation in the number of wild lions poached on the Mozambican side of the Great Limpopo Transfrontier Conservation Area, with a marked increase since 2015. They report that 26% of the lion population in this park has been lost due to poaching for their body parts.

“In the year immediately preceding the quota [June 2016 to May 2017], 13 captive-bred lions in South Africa were poached for their body parts. The EWT [trust] notes with concern that during the first year of the quota [June 2017 to May 2018] there were 12 poaching incidents, resulting in 31 lions being killed.”

Sapa said captive-bred lions were not recognised internationally as a valid segment of the lion population in Africa. “Their possible demise is not seen as extinction or a threat to the species.”

amandaw@citizen.co.za

INFO
A report prepared by EMS, an activist charity, and lobby group Ban Animal Trading, shows that lion bones are sold on the black market as tiger bones. The bones are dropped into rice wine vats and sold as tiger bone wine which is promoted in Asian markets as a treatment for rheumatism and impotence. The bones are also used to produce tiger bone cakes – an exotic small bar of melted bones mixed with additives like turtle shell. – Ross Harvey, senior researcher in Natural Resource Governance (Africa), South African Institute of International Affairs on The Conversation

https://citizen.co.za/news/south-africa ... interdict/
Please check Needs Attention pre-booking: https://africawild-forum.com/viewtopic.php?f=322&t=596

User avatar
Richprins
Committee Member
Posts: 57086
Joined: Sat May 19, 2012 3:52 pm
Location: NELSPRUIT

Re: Lion Bones export Approved/Blood Lions

Post by Richprins » Thu Sep 27, 2018 10:01 am

A captive lion sadly peers from his prison of chains and bars, longing for the freedom of the jungle. Picture: iStock

:O^
Please check Needs Attention pre-booking: https://africawild-forum.com/viewtopic.php?f=322&t=596

User avatar
Lisbeth
Global Moderator
Posts: 45088
Joined: Sat May 19, 2012 12:31 pm
Country: Switzerland
Location: Lugano, Switzerland

Re: Lion Bones export Approved/Blood Lions

Post by Lisbeth » Thu Sep 27, 2018 10:26 am

Whatever they are dreaming is not for us to know, but don't you think that animals can suffer? I can assure you that cats are dreaming and can suffer not only physically.

Have you never had a pet?
"Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world." Nelson Mandela
The desire for equality must never exceed the demands of knowledge

User avatar
Lisbeth
Global Moderator
Posts: 45088
Joined: Sat May 19, 2012 12:31 pm
Country: Switzerland
Location: Lugano, Switzerland

Re: Lion Bones export Approved/Blood Lions

Post by Lisbeth » Thu Sep 27, 2018 11:38 am

NSPCA battles environmental affairs over lion bone quota

2018-09-26 14:45
Duncan Alfreds


The National Council of SPCAs (NSPCA) has lodged an urgent application with the South Gauteng High Court in Johannesburg against the Department of Environmental Affairs (DEA) to interdict the department's authorisation for the export of lion bones.

The NSPCA says it objects to the lack of proper consideration behind the DEA's decision to increase the quota from 800 to 1 500 while a judicial review is underway.

"We do not believe that there should be a quota at all," Karen Trendler, NSPCA wildlife trade and trafficking manager told News24.

She added that there were significant welfare concerns associated with the breeding of lions for slaughter.

Welfare concerns

The NSPCA listed its concerns over the quota which it argued would have a negative impact on the big cats.

"The NSPCA also believes, for both the review and interdict purposes that:

- there is inadequate regulation of lions' conditions of captivity and slaughter;
- the study on which the decision was based is incomplete;
- the DEA failed to comply with its statutory duty to consult;
- based on expert opinion and data available, considers the decision to be scientifically irrational;
- lion bone trade may threaten the viability of lion and other big cat populations globally, encouraging consumers to utilise lion bone as a replacement for tiger bone in wine, tonics and traditional medicines and may increase demand;
- captive lion 'farming' is an industry that has no conservation value and poses a risk to both wild lion, tiger and other big cat populations globally; and
- The lion bone trade has links to transnational wildlife crime syndicates and other wildlife crime."
Trendler said the organisation's concerns about the African lion (Panthera leo) were shared by other organisations and were receiving attention from the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (Cites).

Habitat loss

The African lion is listed on Appendix 1 on Cites, which means it is on the list of the most endangered among Cites-listed animals and plants and is threatened with extinction.

Despite that, conservation group Born Free believes South Africa is the world's largest exporter of lion bones and skeletons; South Africa has between 6 000 and 8 000 lions in captive breeding facilities, compared to an estimate of 2 876 living in the wild.

The World Wide Fund for Nature says that African lions used to roam across most of Africa, but are now confined mostly to eastern and southern Africa.

The organisation adds that lion bones have become increasingly in-demand – sometimes as a substitute for tiger bones – as an ingredient in traditional Asian medicine.

"The global and local concerns for the captive breeding of lion for canned hunting and bone resulted in the chairman of the parliamentary Portfolio Committee on Environment holding a two-day parliamentary colloquium in August this year – the largest and longest parliamentary colloquium to date at which the captive lion industry and the impact on Brand SA, conservation value etc and lion bone quota were interrogated," said Trendler.

She added that the change in perception of canned hunting – the practice where lions are raised in captivity and released just before being shot – has made an impact on the demand for bones.

"Trophy hunting and canned lion hunting were for many years the main source of bone for export but with global opposition to canned hunting, and changes in trophy import regulations, lion bone became a primary product with lions being slaughtered for bone. The slaughter is not adequately controlled or regulated, and we have cruelty cases pending."

Read the court papers here:

https://docdro.id/0CAt7Nu
"Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world." Nelson Mandela
The desire for equality must never exceed the demands of knowledge

User avatar
Lisbeth
Global Moderator
Posts: 45088
Joined: Sat May 19, 2012 12:31 pm
Country: Switzerland
Location: Lugano, Switzerland

Re: Lion Bones export Approved/Blood Lions

Post by Lisbeth » Wed Oct 10, 2018 11:12 am

NSPCA heads for court to halt trade in lion skeletons

BY DON PINNOCK - 8 OCTOBER 2018 - DAILY MAVERICK

Image
The NSPCA has made an urgent application to the Gauteng High Court which contains photographic evidence of alarming and persistent neglect by a game farmer in Alldays. Photo: SPCA

The National Council of Societies for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (NSPCA) has applied for an urgent interdict in an attempt to stop the South African government from facilitating selling lion bones used in fake tiger bone wine and other questionable purposes.

The lion bone trade is the ugly side of the already discredited canned lion hunting industry. According to the interdict applied for against the Minister of Environmental Affairs, it is leading to horrendous welfare violations of an iconic species.

In mid last year, the NSPCA filed notice to set aside the export quota of 800 lion skeletons. Before this could be reviewed, the minister upped the annual quota for 2018 to 1,500. There are now reports of lion slaughter houses being set up to service the demand from Asian buyers.

The NSPCA says cruelty to lions is an inevitable consequence of the DEA’s (Department of Environmental Affairs) misguided actions and is therefore “committed to fighting this decision in court to protect the lions of South Africa”. It has gut-wrenching photographs to back its case.

In the interdict, it says there’s currently no legislation in SA that regulates the keeping and slaughtering of lions. It points out that by fostering the trade in lion skeletons, the DEA is threatening the existence of wild lions in Africa by expanding a market which poachers will exploit.

“With trophy hunting of lions,” it says, “the lions are required to be in good condition. This is not the case with the lion bone trade. There’s no economic incentive for breeders of captive-bred lions to ensure that their lions are appropriately fed and maintained in a good condition, since all that is required is an adult lion skeleton”.

Image
With international pressure on canned lion hunting, breeders are turning to the sale of lion bones. For this the condition of the living lions is irrelevant. This lion was photographed on a breeding farm in Alldays, Limpopo. Photo: NSPCA

With increasing international opprobrium for canned lion hunting and subsequent bans on trophy imports, breeders are switching to the bone trade as their primary business. From reports and photographs of breeding facilities – mainly in the Free State and North West – there is growing evidence that breeders are spending as little as possible on lion upkeep in order to maximise profits.

Increased skeleton export quotas, says the interdict, means increased levels of cruelty and the likelihood of the legal trade providing cover for poached wild lions.

There are around 8,000 lions in captivity in South Africa and 3,000 wild lions. “If the 2018 quota (which is half the number of wild lions) results in a spike in poaching of wild lions – a danger which the DEA simply cannot on its available data say is not likely – the wild lion population could be decimated to levels that put the survival of the species at risk.”

The DEA continues to insist that the welfare of captive-bred lions is not its responsibility and abrogates this responsibility to the NSPCA, which is the only organisation legally mandated to ensure the welfare of animals and prevent cruelty to them. However, the organisation already stretched too thin in terms of staff and finances and does not receive government funding.

The NSPCA claims the country is “sitting on a ticking time bomb” in relation to the welfare of both wild and captive-bred lions. It points out that the DEA is required by law to determine the lion bone quota only in circumstances where it has determined that there is a proper scientific basis for doing so and after a proper public consultation process. Neither of these requirements have been met.

It says there is no evidence that the regulated lion skeleton trade serves as a buffer for wild lion populations. “Rather, the science … points in the other direction … it is likely to fuel demand.”

It adds that “there is no reliable evidence to establish that interdicting the export of lion bone will cause harm to the South African economy. On the other hand, the evidence suggests that the captive-bred lion industry is harming the South African (tourism) economy and costing it revenue and jobs”.

Image
The Animal Protection Act states “that any person who unnecessarily starves or under-feeds or denies water or food to any animal shall, subject to the provisions of this Act and any other law, be guilty of an offence and liable on conviction to a fine or to imprisonment for a period not exceeding twelve months imprisonment without the option of a fine’. Photo: NSPCA

Captive-bred lions, says NSPCA head Marcelle Meredith, have no conservation value: “You cannot teach a captive lion to hunt. Only wild lions can teach their young to hunt and survive in the wild. Savannah ecosystems depend on super-predators like lion to maintain their essential balance. We can’t replace them with animals bred in captivity.

“We have to look after our wild lions for all that they represent to South Africa, appreciating the terrible truth that once they are gone, they are gone forever.”

Following a two-day Parliamentary colloquium on captive and hunted lions in August this year, the chairperson of Portfolio Committee on Environmental Affairs, Philemon Mapulane, said the breeding of lions in captivity for purposes of hunting, lion bone and lion skeleton trade was “the most controversial subject in the conservation industry”. He expressed his personal distaste for the activity. The issue, he said, “will be followed up by the committee with the sheer tenacity of a hungry lion chasing its prey”.

After the colloquium, 24 conservation organisations sent a letter to the Portfolio Committee calling for trade in lion bones from South Africa be immediately prohibited.

“Furthermore, all facilities must immediately cease the breeding of lions for commercial purposes. We propose a phased-out approach to the closing down of the captive lion industry to accommodate current pregnant females.”

Read original article: https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article ... skeletons/
"Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world." Nelson Mandela
The desire for equality must never exceed the demands of knowledge

Return to “Lions and Other Endangered Animals Management and Poaching”